Validating a number uk berkshire dating trial

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Most cell phones in the US don't require it, and it'll start to baffle the younger generation unless they've dialed internationally. Beyond that - the list you gave does not include another common US format - leaving off the initial 1.On the contrary, the 555 prefix is reserved for fake-out phone numbers. :\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? -Adam My gut feeling is reinforced by the amount of replies to this topic - that there is a virtually infinite number of solutions to this problem, none of which are going to be elegant.Those numbers are guaranteed not to connect to an actual phone number so they're often used in television and movies to ensure that a viewer doesn't try to call the number and end up harassing some poor [email protected] While that was true decades ago, it is no longer true. Honestly, I would recommend you don't try to validate phone numbers.Sort Codes are a unique number assigned to branches of banks and financial institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland.United Kingdom's sort codes and bank accounts system provides a number of internal checksum validation methods which are used to verify if a bank account number is correctly composed.It turns out that there's something of a spec for this, at least for North America, called the NANP. The question should probably be specified in a bit more detail to explain the purpose of validating the numbers. You've correctly identified that it's a tricky problem...

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$ here it is without the extension section (I make my users enter ext in a separate field): ^(? Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you. If you're talking about form validation, the regexp to validate correct meaning as well as correct data is going to be extremely complex because of varying country and provider standards. I interpret the question as looking for a broadly valid pattern, which may not be internally consistent - for example having a valid set of numbers, but not validating that the trunk-line, exchange, etc. North America is straightforward, and for international I prefer to use an 'idiomatic' pattern which covers the ways in which people specify and remember their numbers: The North American pattern makes sure that if one parenthesis is included both are. And while stripping all/most non-numeric characters may work well on the server side (especially if you are planning on passing these values to a dialer), you may not want to thrash the user's input during validation, particularly if you want them to make corrections in another field. It should be compatible with international numbers and localization formats. I answered this question on another SO question before deciding to also include my answer as an answer on this thread, because no one was addressing how to require/not require items, just handing out regexs: Regex working wrong, matching unexpected things From my post on that site, I've created a quick guide to assist anyone with making their own regex for their own desired phone number format, which I will caveat (like I did on the other site) that if you are too restrictive, you may not get the desired results, and there is no "one size fits all" solution to accepting all possible phone numbers in the world - only what you decide to accept as your format of choice. Note that it doesn't have any special rules for how many digits, or what numbers are valid in those digits, it just verifies that only digits, parenthesis, dashes, plus, space, pound, asterisk, period, comma, or the letters are present.

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